Connect-Ed

A Weekly Roundup of Education Stories | April 21

by Kelly Lynch-Stange   |   Apr 21, 2017
Take Note | Connect-Ed (Sam Yates | KCPT)

In 2012, Trinity Lutheran Church in Columbia, Missouri applied for a state grant to resurface its playground through a tire recycling program run by The Missouri Department of Natural Resources. The state denied the proposal, citing a Missouri Supreme Court ruling that bars giving state aid to religious institutions. On Wednesday, The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on the case, with a ruling expected in late June. PBS NewsHour examines the case and a late-in-the-game policy change by Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

Playground case touches on separation of church and state

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court signaled Wednesday that it will decide an important case on the separation of church and state in favor of a Missouri church that wants state money to put a soft surface on its preschool playground.

 

Following the Kansas City Public School District’s closing of Southwest Early College Campus last spring, a group of parents began convening to gauge interest on a new project-based learning high school. On Wednesday, the group known as Uniting at Southwest, gathered at Bier Station in Waldo for an initial gathering of volunteers, parents and local supporters. KCUR spoke with some of the leaders of the group on their thoughts on working with the district.

Parents Begin Campaign To Reopen Southwest As Project-Based Learning School

Maybe you've noticed the yard signs featuring a pixelated, rainbow "U" popping up in the city's southwest quadrant. Parents who want to see the former Southwest Early College Campus reopened as a project-based learning high school met Wednesday at Bier Station in the Waldo neighborhood.

 

During his first year teaching in Finland, Timothy Walker noticed the students in his fifth grade class were having a negative reaction to his American style of teaching. Finnish kids, who typically take multiple 15 minutes breaks throughout the school day, were resisting the American method of consecutive hours of lecture. In this report from KQED, Walker discusses research on the Finnish model of teaching and after implementing the methods in his classroom, he explores the idea of frequent brain breaks throughout the day.

How Kids Learn Better By Taking Frequent Breaks Throughout The Day

Excerpted from Teach Like Finlan d: 33 Simple Strategies For Joyful Classrooms (c) 2017 by Schedule brain breaks Timothy D. Walker. Used with permission of the publisher, W. W. Norton. Like a zombie, Sami* -one of my fifth graders-lumbered over to me and hissed, "I think I'm going to explode!

— Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @KCPTedu for the latest education stories and Take Note events.